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About Literature / Professional Member Patrick R. NolanMale/United States Groups :iconpokemonprofessors: PokemonProfessors
 
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I'm breaking character once again to talk about something...and unfortunately, I can't ask for much interactivity on this one (though you are welcome to try). This is a rant...but a deserved one. Some of the things I am going to say might offend some people who don't like to make waves...but if I've said it once, I've said it a thousand times...that sometimes what Game Freak tells us just isn't enough.

I just finished watching a video on the issues of multiple universes in the Pokemon world by The Game Theorists; please watch this before continuing on. If anyone here says anything, I give full rights to the producers of this video for anything and everything they want, and if I get in trouble for posting this without their permission, I sincerely apologize...but I am not a YouTube presence. If they are open to it, though, I  would love to discuss this further with these people...if anyone can get me connections to them. Thousands of people have visited me in my time here; somebody is bound to know somebody. Anyways, here it is:



Now that we have that out of the way, it's time for my rant.

I completely agree with everything in this video. I am not ashamed to say that; as a scientist, I can say that everything here is perfectly sound and does, in fact, pretty much explain everything. So my problem is not with The Game Theorists at all; hell, I respect them a great for what they do. It's comforting to have other scientists out there that are trying to apply real-world science to something that is otherwise not intended to be seen realistically.

What I have a problem with is that this viewpoint, just like many that I have seen, is looking at the Pokemon universe from one direction, namely from the outside in. But that's not what I do.

I look from the inside out. That's what makes my work different, and I really don't think that this side of the coin really gets looked at much at all by serious people.

When we look at video game series like Pokemon, we are tempted to look at things from the outside; we try to take what worlds are given to us and we apply science to them as onlookers from above. These worlds are for us to explore and connect with our own world, and in doing so, we see both of these worlds in a different light. And, as shocking as it might be to some, that's how I originally looked at the Pokemon world when I started writing reports here. For the few that are still here that know me from when I first started, I sucked. My stuff was crap. It's amazing what five years of writing, rewriting, reformatting and revising can do for one's work quality.

I honestly think, though, that my viewpoint switched the moment I started writing my analyses on the 18 Pokemon types. Sure, talking about the Fire-type or the Ice-type is pretty easy for many...but the Ghost-type? The Dark-type? The fricken' Dragon-type!? Do you have any idea how ridiculous those types seem in the context of the real world? Actually, I retract that statement, because if you are a true fan, you know EXACTLY what I am talking about. I had to think differently. I had to think what they could possibly be defined by in a way that seemed realistic but nonetheless fitting for the Pokemon universe. And that's when it happened. I stopped applying science to Pokemon to explain them; I started making them real, and THEN I applied the science to them. I stopped working and thinking in terms of the real world: I started thinking as if I was a part of the actual Pokemon universe...or multiverse, as the case now seems to be.

Anyone that has read my reports on Criminal Organizations also knows this, especially in my recent work on Teams Aqua and Magma. Sure, we could have different universes where one team was the threat and not the other...but then how to explain the opposite scenario? Looking from the outside in, we simply assume that they are different universes and leave it at that. But looking from the inside out...no, that just couldn't work. Even if you knew you were in a parallel universe, you couldn't really know the events that transpired in another universe without going there...and I'll leave it at that. So what did I do? I did the unthinkable: I created a composite universe, an original canon, that includes part of each 'official' canon in order to make one universe out of two. Sure, that seems like it's too easy of a choice, but it's the fairest when you look at both sides of the situation and I think that it preserves the integrity of all stories equally.

So yes, I am sort of denying what Zinnia herself said...and yet I am not. It wasn't until I saw this video that I realized that I have done something more than just bring fair realism to the Pokemon world...I, intentionally or not, created my own canon. One that seems now to be completely broken off of the super-canon that Game Freak is piloting these days. I never sought out this goal. I wanted to do something different here and put my love of Pokemon towards something novel so I could make a few friends. Instead of remaining a hobby, it has snowballed into a career that dominates just as much time in my life as my real career as a graduate student in paleontology...and perhaps even more. I did something, and you all liked it. You kept criticizing and complimenting me on my work, and it drove me to keep on working...and it still very much does. I am thankful for all of you, because...well, you guys have made me someone special. I have never had any close friends, and for the most part, people don't really talk to me about anything other than my school work. But for the last five years, I have had all of you. You guys and girls have made my life feel like it matters outside of my work. Because of you, I have become more than just a fan. I am more than just a writer.

I am Professor Patrick Ray Wormwood, an Official Professor of Pokemon. I even have the business cards to prove it.

And for that reason, I can also say that there is probably no chance of me ever getting my work realistically published. Clearly, my canon and attempts to understands the concrete nature of the Pokemon multiverse are contradictory to those of Game Freak, and the two don't seem all that compatible. But you know what? I don't care. I'm going to keep writing and revising (just as I right now, in fact), and I'm not going to stop until the series is dead or I kick the bucket...whichever comes first. This my my...no, that's not right...

This is OUR canon. Game Freak can say what it wants, and so can everyone else, but there is another side to the Pokemon community. There is a side that doesn't just try to be a part of it; we ARE a part of it. We ARE Pokemon Trainers, Scientists, Athletes, Pokemon Rangers, Professors...this is WHO we are. And regardless of what they say, we can't just give this up when the time comes. We can't grow up. It's too late for us. Our story needs to be heard.

Hmm......well, this didn't turn out to be quite the rant I thought it would. Then again, I guess it's a good thing when an angry rant ends on a more positive note. I can't find anyone outside of here to have a serious conversation with on this subject, so I guess this is the best I can do.

While it might be a but pessimistic, I think that Game Freak is doing all of this because we asked too many questions. We demanded an answer, and they gave us one...

But for some of us, it isn't enough. So we make out own canon, create our own worlds, and do with them as we see fit. That is the ultimate power of the fan, and I hope that never dies. And I hope even more that maybe, someday, if we ever get the chance, we'll get those in power to listen to our side of the story and maybe give us a chance to prove that there is more than one way to live in this world...

Alright, I've yakked for long enough. Shout out to The Game Theorists: keep on trucking scientists, you're making life easier every day for those of us embedded in more than one reality. I will continue to update my material when possible, though school starts in a few days, so I can't promise a ton of activity. Hopefully I've made a point somewhere in here and have not just written a lot of gobbledygook as a tired man dying to get some sleep.

This is Professor Wormwood, signing out and wishing you a good day.
  • Mood: Noble
  • Listening to: Pokemon ORAS Soundtrack
  • Reading: Grimm's Complete Fairy Tales
  • Watching: The Daily Show
  • Playing: Pokemon ORAS
  • Eating: The invigorating battlecry of literature
  • Drinking: Milk
As an update to everyone, I am in the slow process of modifying my work...again...but this time, it is for the last time. I didn't realize how much stuff I had to actually update before, and rather than nitpicking things, I figured I might as well go through the whole catalogue for my own benefit, reducing the amount of work I will have to do when the time for publishing comes. As such, you will all probably start seeing some strange tweaks or inconsistencies in my reports, and I apologize if it takes a while; school is starting up again soon, and this is going to be the most intense semester of my graduate school career...so it may take a very long time to get everything done.

On another note, I actually went on Wifi internet for the first time and got to interact with some people from across the globe for the first time. It was interesting, to say the least. I had my first two battles and won both of them, which wasn't easy, speaking out of character. I accidentally got involved with what I definitely think was a professional battler, as he had 101 battles already under his belt, and beat him unintentionally with a team full of legendaries while he had none. I felt bad for beating him, but less than five seconds later, he challenged me to a rematch...with his own team of legendaries. Things turned out badly for me at first because...well, I wasn't used to the controls, and I accidentally gave myself a handicap by only putting in four Pokémon instead of six. I couldn't believe that I had made such a foolish mistake...and then I beat him while losing only two of my Pokémon. I'd say that's a fine way to end one's first professional battle.

I also made a couple of trades, one of which I really wanted to talk to you guys about so I could hear your opinion. I make it explicitly clear to myself never to trade shinies for shinies, because...well, I caught them myself; they are a representation of my own luck and I would never get rid of something like that. That's why I instead raise professional combatants in the hope that someone might be willing to give up a shiny Pokémon for something that is hand-trained by myself, but I also know that few people would ever make such a trade when they could raise such a fighter themselves. I encountered an individual who wanted to trade something with me, and while it wasn't anything that I wanted, I went ahead with it anyways since it was my first online trade. I was going to click off when I saw them put something else up for trade: a shiny Trubbish from the Lost Hotel of the Kalos region. Not wanting to fall into the pitfall I mentioned earlier, I put up a Lv100 Skarmory I had hand-raised with Max IVs, Impish Nature, Max EVs in Attack and Defense and Drill Peck as an Egg Move along with Steel Wing, Rock Slide and X-Scissor. I figured that they would pull that shiny Trubbish almost immediately...except they didn't. They accepted the trade.

Was that the right thing to happen? Raising that Skarmory was no easy feat, but shiny Pokémon are so rare...I sort of feel guilty because I don't know whether or not I did the right thing or cheated someone out of a prized possession. What do you guys think?

Anyways, it is official: Professor Wormwood is on Wifi. I probably won't get to use it much, but in case you ever see my name, feel free to ask me for a trade or battle; I am happy to oblige and look forward to maybe seeing one of you some day.

Alright, back to work; have a nice day everyone. :)
  • Mood: Neutral
  • Listening to: Pokemon ORAS Soundtrack
  • Reading: Grimm's Complete Fairy Tales
  • Watching: The Daily Show
  • Playing: Pokemon ORAS
  • Eating: The invigorating battlecry of literature
  • Drinking: Milk

Hey, everybody; how’s it going? I hope that everyone had a nice holiday vacation. This journal is going to be spoken out of character and cover a major issue that I think really needs to be addressed. I have been thinking about this quite a bit this last week, and I think that it’s time to speak. It’s going to be a long exposition, so if you don’t want to read a lot, you are free to skip this message; I think that the journal title pretty much covers the point I am going to end up making. Otherwise, read on.

If you ask me, I find it quite amazing that the Pokémon franchise has managed to last as long as it has. We now have 721 species of Pokémon spanning over six generations with seemingly no end in sight, new games coming out nearly every single year these days. Sure, generation six only introduced a fairly small number of new Pokémon, but I think that we can all agree that it did little to deter us from enjoying our adventures in the Kalos region and especially our return to the Hoenn region recently. Every generation, new mechanics are added that spice up the action and give us new places to explore and conquer, but at the very heart of it, Pokémon is still what is has always been: a chance to enter a world very much like our own, but where imagination has run rampant both for the common man and the world of science.

I myself am a veteran of generation one and have been with the franchise ever since it first came out. The original Red and Green versions in Japan might not have been the success that we would have expected them to be as a result of their buggy nature, but when we got Red and Blue over here in the U.S. that mattered little. I was just a little kid when they came out, and I was hooked the moment I started playing Pokémon Red. I still remember my very first Pokémon team, from that game, too: Charizard, Lapras, Mr. Mime, Farfetch’d and Hypno. I never really got into competitive pay, and I never figured out how EV and IV mechanics even worked until generation four…actually, I never understood much of the mechanics until then; I was still just a kid. The fun of playing was the only thing driving me to continue playing, and now that has been somewhat replaced by the work that I do here…but I still love the Pokémon world just the same. It’s kind of funny, actually…all of my friends sort of dropped out of the running after generation four, but I kept going and still actively play the games when I get the chance. I am so devoted to the series now that it’s almost the only thing that I even pay anymore; I will probably pick up the next Zelda title when it comes out, but in all truth, the only other game series that I will take time off to play anymore is Metroid, my second-favorite video game series of all time. I am a veteran of that series too and have both played and fully beaten every single game in the series.

Life today in the world of Pokémon is certainly an interesting one, and while I am not surprised to see how much the series has changed (and happy that it did, because there was a LOT wrong with generation one and the type settings for physical and special attacks really needed to be changed long before generation four), I am awestruck over how long it has lasted and how much steam it still seems to have going for it. Yes, X/Y and ORAS put together a nice, complete story that explains much about Mega Evolution, but the mystery of Zygarde is still out there and I am anxious to see what action Game Freak will take next in revealing its true power. We all know at this point that it will likely have two Mega Evolutions (given the pervasiveness of the concept in the main plotlines of these past games and the beast’s overall base stat total), but that’s about all that really can be said at this point. Still, it amazes me that we have gotten to this point. While the disconnect between generations two and three makes data transfer impossible, I myself still have some of the Pokémon I had in Ruby when I first played it, transferred over time through subsequent games with the assistance of two game systems; this works out for me better than the alternative as many people will not willingly trade back stuff to you, so this way I can keep all of my shiny Pokémon and those I need to fully compete my Pokédex in every single game. I have it down to a formula now, and while that might take away some of the fun in the process, I prefer it as a means of getting things done as quickly and efficiently as possible. I understand all of the game mechanics now and take full advantage of them just as any adult and professional trainer would. Thankfully, though I have lost my innocence on that note, the series has never ceased to amaze me and always has me on the edge of my seat, wondering what jump the series will make next.

Right now, though, I am at a crossroads, and it brings me to the subject of this journal. Many of you might not realize it, but my work here is not the only thing going on in my life; in fact, it is only a part of it. Right now, I am actually a graduate student as the State University of New York at Buffalo, earning a degree in Paleontology, the study of ancient life forms. I am a straight-A student and the best at what I do at my current level of education, and what time I have to get work done for here is only done in my free time; my real work must come first. Yet, at the same time, I have much to owe my work here regarding my academics. As I am sure fellow writers will inform you, when you write so much material over a long period of time you have a habit of developing your own style of writing, and it my case that happened as a result of all of my reports on Pokémon. What makes this interesting for me is that the style I have developed has also made my writing extremely useful for scientific writing in the real world. My hobby has effectively made me the best writer in my University’s program and is completely distinct from the style used by everyone else that I know. I think that this is likely because my colleagues were taught a specific manner of how to write and stuck with it; that never happened to me because my writing style was deemed more than sufficient by my professors in my undergraduate years, so I never had a reason to change. As such, I can say for certain that my career has benefited severely from my work here, and I thank you all for that making that happen. All of you gave me the support I needed to keep going on this work, and I feel blessed to have met all of you. This is a dream come true for me, and while I cannot say whether or not I will be able to get my material published, I regret none of the thousands of hours I have put into all of this.

But this brings up a problem question that I think has yet to really be addressed by anyone: What happens when the series dies? It cannot be denied that it is going to happen someday…someday, Pokémon will end. And what will happen to all of us when that happens? Think about those that have dedicated their lives fully to the cause, like Jwitz on YouTube. I cannot tell you how much I wish I could live his life…he gets to spend all of time living his dream in that world, while others like myself have difficult careers to work for. I wish I could devote all of my time to the series…but I do what I do out of hindsight, because I know someday it will all end. What will the others do when that happens? Do they have something else to keep their lives as they are? Will they be able to survive after the series is over? I know not these answers, but I do have an even bigger question: How will the series affect all of us in the long-term? I could be doing all sorts of things right now related to my work alone and never spend a moment on Pokémon, but I can’t just stop now; I have embedded myself far too deeply into the series, and so much of my memory is devoted to it now…so what will happen to all of that knowledge when the series is over? Will I forget about it and simply move on, or will my mind still retain what may otherwise be useless information at that point? I think we all need to ask ourselves these questions, because it isn’t just Pokémon that is the problem. This goes for all game series; in tine, they will all end. Well, maybe not all of them…Mario will still probably be here even after the apocalypse…but you get my point.

And we don’t have to wait to see what will happen: We already got a taste of this future thanks to Capcom. Some might argue otherwise, but I think that it has been long enough that I can say this without repercussion: Mega Man is dead. Yeah, he got a spot on Smash Bros., but a cameo does not make a franchise. I know people that loved the series…heck, I was one of them…and now that it is gone, I fell sort of empty in my mind as the data I have on the series is no longer that relevant. I know people that had dedicated their lives to the series…and when it was all over, their lives immediately took a turn for the worst and they lost their ability to support themselves. I know that this probably sounds like an extreme case, but Pokémon is just as big if not more so than Mega Man was…so will the same thing happen to all of us? Will we be left out in the dust? As long as Satoshi Tajiri is around, I don’t see that as a realistic fate, but if something happens and he would die…via accident or old age…I believe that the series will likely die with him. It’s his baby, after all, and since Mega Man was effectively killed off when Inafune left, I think that the same fate may befall our beloved franchise.

Moreover, what will happen when we lose some of the biggest names in the industry…like Shigeru Miyamoto? Yes, he technically is just a major overseer at this point, but the man made the game industry what it is today; Nintendo was here first and saved us from the disaster that Atari and its competitors brought to the market in the 80’s…and thanks to him, we have Mario, who again will probably outlast human civilization. What will Nintendo do when he leaves this world? How will the world respond? Can we be sure that our franchise will survive, or will something precious to us crumble? Again, this might be going out on an extreme limb, but I think that Mega Man demonstrates that such a thing can happen.

These are all questions that I think we as gamers need to think about. Video games are a major part of the world now and our culture has spread so far and wide that you can rarely ever find a person who hasn’t played, seen or at least heard of video games in their life. The culture is so pervasive, and even the military has been touched; I have seen people control drones with Xbox controllers before in person, and many other aspects of technology prevalent in all types of electronics are connected to the video game industry. Granted, we probably would still be developing machines like computers and even artificial intelligence if video games had never become mainstream, but they have helped create something very important to this technology-driven world: interactivity. These games have constantly developed so that players have a greater sense of entertainment and immersion, and in doing so I think that they have rubbed off on other aspects of technology, creating entire worlds on computer servers like World of Warcraft and making things like motion control mainstream enough that they are considered the norm in society. This technology obviously preceded its use in video games, but I think that video games have nonetheless served to bridge the gap between these marvelous technologies and the common man who does not otherwise understand the details of how the technology works.

For the moment, I am going to continue working toward earning a PhD in Paleontology, and I’m pretty sure that’s a statement that no other generation one Pokémon veteran has ever said before. I will still be a part of this world, but I must continue to work towards the future, knowing that one day my beloved franchise will end. But I don’t think that is going to happen for some time…not as long as Satoshi Tajiri is still around. In the meantime, I will also continue to write for here, though I won’t have anything new to add for some time. Still, I will be making periodic changes and alterations when needed, so I will still have a presence here.

I implore you all to think about what I have said here, and if you wish to talk about it, I would love to speak more. I think that this is an issue that we all need to be aware of and consider, because whether or not we like it, everything must eventually end. I do not know if I will ever be able to publish my work, but for the moment, I am okay with that; my work and especially all of you have made me one of the best in my field in the real world, and I can never repay you all for that, however indirect or direct your help may have been. Thank you all for humoring the scientific imagination of a single veteran who effectively has almost no social life outside of here.

Until next time, I hope you all will have a fine day. :)

  • Mood: Neutral
  • Listening to: Pokemon ORAS Soundtrack
  • Reading: Grimm's Complete Fairy Tales
  • Watching: The Daily Show
  • Playing: Pokemon ORAS
  • Eating: The invigorating battlecry of literature
  • Drinking: Milk
Name: Master Hand and Crazy Hand
Title: The Gatekeepers
Goal: Keeping the characters in the Super Smash Bros. world from ever escaping
Current Whereabouts: Final Destination

History/Origins:

The Super Smash Bros. world, also known as the World of Trophies, is a magical place where heroes and villains across multiple universes live and breathe as if there were no boundaries ever separating them, coexisting in a strange peace where everything is settled only within the confines of battle. But behind this wondrous facade, the player is only allowed to see so much and cannot join them or otherwise have these heroes join the confines of other worlds on their own. The reason for this is not because the two worlds cannot coexist with one another; it’s because there is somebody that really does not want to see the two worlds converge. That individual is Master Hand and, by association, his brother, Crazy Hand. The identity of these creatures is something that no character in any world can really answer, but their intentions are more than noticeable to anyone who pays attention. Master Hand is the prime player in this world, and it is his job to set up the battle arenas, choose the players in a game, and effectively declare everything needed from an announcer including the starting point of a match, its ending point and even the names of the winners. As Master Hand has come to learn, however, the power he possesses to bring to life the many hero trophies scattered across the world, not to mention all of the villain trophies and even enemy trophies, comes with a cost in that his characters gain full sentience and believe that they are who they really appear to be. In this struggle, these animated trophies often try to beat others just so they can get the chance to go back to their home world; doing so, however, would break down the dimensional barrier surrounding the World of Trophies, creating time and spatial discontinuities that could potentially destroy not only the World of Trophies but any world that they try to enter. In response, Master Hand must step in from time to time and battle against these animated objects, making sure that they never escape their world. To the denizens of the World of Trophies, Master Hand is a villain unlike any other and does everything he must to ensure that they never leave this place, but this is an unfair account seeing as the consequences of letting them out are far too great to even consider. He shirked this duty for a time when he was being mind-controlled by Tabuu, but since the defeat of him and the Subspace army, Master Hand has returned to his old post with little problem. Nonetheless, Master Hand is more than villainous when it comes to his tactics, as he will literally crush and destroy anything that dares to get in his way. Despite all of his power, however, Master Hand is occasionally not strong enough to prevent total destruction of multiple worlds; when he becomes weakened or is in need of immediate backup, he will gladly call on his brother, Crazy Hand. This psychotic counterpart is about nothing more than crowd control and rarely steps in the world on his own, which makes sense considering his personality is twisted and borderline insane, using pure destruction and uncertainty to mash and decimate anything that gets in his way. Even if one or both of them loses, Master Hand will always make a parting shot stick to their target when their guard is down, turning them back into a trophy and starting the game all over again. Because time never passes in the World of Trophies, these two are effectively immortal and will likely be in their home stage, the Final Destination, for all eternity, making sure that the World of Trophies does not leak into others and cause chaos far beyond what any deity could possibly control.

Personality:

Master Hand and Crazy Hand may be brothers, but the two could not be further apart when it comes to ideologies and behavior. Master Hand is the calmer of the two and is the deity responsible for the creation of the World of Trophies and all of its denizens, all made by his power to animate trophies made of nonliving materials. Master Hand generally prefers to stay out of the limelight in most cases, simply watching and calling matches between his little puppets and living out his entire life in this fantasy world without any complaints or fears. If, however, he is challenged by one of his subjects, Master Hand will transport them to his home dimension in the World of Trophies, a mechanical island known only as the Final Destination. When confronted up close, Master Hand will gladly reveal himself in a hearty manner, laughing at his challenger knowing that they will never make it out even if he is defeated in battle. Master Hand is much more powerful than he appears and will gladly use every trick in the book to take out his challenger, striking fiercely and without mercy in an attempt to subdue his target as quickly as possible. Despite this aggressive nature, however, Master Hand is fairly complacent most of the time and just likes playing with his toys, so calling him a villain outside of the Super Smash Bros. world itself would be a crime. Crazy Hand, however, is the complete opposite of his brother; while he only ever shows up to assist Master Hand if he is struggling in battle, Crazy Hand immediately makes his presence known to his target and attacks them erratically, striking with quick, unpredictable attacks that are slightly weaker than those of Master Hand but are otherwise rife with nasty elemental after-effects that are absent from Master Hand’s moves. Crazy Hand cares only about destroying whatever opponent his brother might be facing and will do so gladly, even at the expense of his own self-being. Despite the fact that their personalities clash in more ways than one, these creatures are paramount tag-team champions in their world and are able to use several powerful moves together that are capable of destroying a target in seconds; they might not always agree on everything, but these two work better together than they ever could on their own.

Powers:

While it might be obvious, the greatest power that Master Hand is his inherent ability to essentially turn lifeless, cheap trophies into fully sentient beings with just a touch of his finger, creating hundreds if not thousands of different worlds with whatever fighters or creatures he wants, never having to worry about rules; in effect, he is the rulebook. Everything that Master Hand creates is not dictated to follow his orders, which works well for him as it makes his interactions with his toys much more lively. When they become too rambunctious, however, Master Hand will gladly lay the smack down on his target, striking them in a multitude of different ways, including poking, slapping, slamming, walking over, drilling, grabbing, punching and even sweeping his opponents away with great physical force. His abilities go even beyond these otherwise simple physical strikes, as he can also generate and fire fiery bullets from his fingers and even generate small laser beams from his fingertips that sweep across the battlefield and inflict decent damage on a target. Unlike most everything else in the World of Trophies, Master Hand does not take damage indirectly from attacks but directly, so instead of a percentage damage bar, he actually has a set amount of energy available and thus can only take so much damage before he must retreat to the shadows and turn his opponent back into a trophy. Crazy Hand has a similar array of attacks at his disposal, but instead of working as a creator, his entire purpose is to assist Master Hand in crowd control; as such, his attacks and powers are focused more on sheer destruction than creation, a fact reflected in his abnormal attacks and abilities. Unlike Master Hand, who tends to follow a set strategy in battle, Crazy Hand’s actions are completely erratic and he will gladly strike at any place at any time without so much as a thought beforehand, making him slightly less effective but much more unpredictable than his brother. What he lacks in creation-based powers, however, Crazy Hand more than makes up for in attack, as although his attacks are slightly less damaging than those of Master Hand, most of his basic physical and projectile-based attacks carry a nasty side-effect with them, such as freezing, electrocuting, planting an energy-sapping plant and even enshrouding his target in darkness for a limited amount of time. In addition, he is known for simply flopping around on the ground of Final Destination violently in an attempt to trap a target underneath him (inflicting considerable damage in the process) and can even conjure up fiery bombs that he randomly drops in his unsuspecting target. Together, these two are even more damaging, as they can combine simple slaps, catches and punches together to deal massive damage to any target caught in between them and in turn inflicting devastating burns, shadow damage, electrocution and even incapacitate their target with sleep. These two hands might not look that dangerous, but get in their way, and there is absolutely no telling what they might be capable of.

Following his possession by Tabuu, Master Hand in particular has become even more unstable than Crazy Hand, and when the pair are pushed to their limits by an opponent of extreme technical skill, Master Hand will dismiss his brother and reveal his true form, the diabolical Master Core. In doing so, the white, glove like covering that shields Master Hand’s true presence is violently ripped apart, revealing the glowing ball of energy that serves as his core and the violent storm of chaotic matter that comprises his conscious mind, the Swarm. At this point, Master Core will attempt to attack its opponent by assuming a variety of different forms depending upon the skill level of its current challenger. As the Master Giant, the Swarm will take on an enormous humanoid form that attacks with physical sweeps of its limbs, energy balls, moving the stage arena itself and unleashing forceful screams. As the Master Beast, the Swarm will form into a feral monster and will strike with vicious biting attacks, electric currents, body slams and moving spikes. As the Master Edges, the Swarm will morph into a series of five blades that attack with a variety of slashing strike and massive energy balls. As the Master Shadow, the Swarm will take on the appearance of a larger version of the opposition, attempting to destroy them by mimicking all of their powers and abilities and turning said power against them. If faced with a challenger that is still able to make it past the best the Swarm can throw at them, Master Core will enable said challenger to recover their energy fully before commanding the Swarm to form into a massive, living complex known as the Master Fortress, where a challenger must destroy four target energy sources for the Swarm inside of the complex, fighting off shadowy monsters spawned within and dealing with an ever evolving and changing organic structure. Only upon defeating a set number of these challenges will enable fighters to disperse the Swarm and leave Master Core defenseless, though even without the Swarm he still retains its ability to fire a devastating shockwave capable of defeating any opponent and reverting them back to a trophy state.


Future Potential:

Oddly enough, the future potential of Master Hand and Crazy Hand is indeterminable, as they are both immortal and the sole gatekeepers of the World of Trophies; the moment they vanish, so to will the world that they treat as their playground. As far as villains go, these two will likely remain in the same position they have had from the very start and will almost never decided to leave, especially considering how much fun they seem to have. Outside of the World of Trophies, these two could be hands belonging to just about anyone, even a small child who just got a brand new toy to play with. Within the confines of the World of Trophies, however, these two will likely remain as rulers of the land and will never let up on their duty, hopefully for the sake of everyone else in other universes. There’s not telling what these two will do as they continue to introduce new characters and creatures into the World of Trophies, and for all anyone even knows, they might even be planning to expand their empire beyond the boundaries of their world and possibly into other worlds. If this was ever to be the case, it would be disastrous because only Master Hand and Crazy Hand are able to control the World of Trophies; if another gets fused to it by their authority and theirs alone, it too will come under their influence and will be lost forever to whatever games they might play in the future. Master Hand and Crazy Hand might not mean any true harm to their subjects, but as long as they are around, there is little doubt that peace will never be the norm, a fact that could become extremely devastating to the lives of their toys and innocents in other universes if they ever get tired of playing or decide to expand their playground even further than it is already spread.
Move Name: Hyperspace Fury
Battle Classification: Physical Attack
Type: Dark
Total number of affected targets: 1
Range: 1 adjacent target other than user
Direct contact needed to initiate attack: Yes
Base Power: 100
Accuracy Rate: Perfect
PP: 5 (maximum 8)

While it certainly might not be a move that most trainers will ever get to see used in battle, the Hyperspace Fury attack is a devastating move that can easily get the drop on the opposition without them ever being able to prepare for it. Considered to be the signature attack of Hoopa in its Unbound Form, the Hyperspace Fury attack involves the user generating multiple teleportation rings from its body and then using them to pummel a target repeatedly at different angles while cloaked in negative energy. The power of this move may come with some defensive backlash at the end, but when it comes to dealing straight damage, no other Dark-type move even comes close to inflicting the kind of carnage this devastating move can inflict on the opposition.

Because they are able to generate wormholes at will, Hoopa have come to use their special powers to get the drop on opponents in and out of battle in order to turn the tide in their favor or at least escape from a battle unscathed. In the case of the Hyperspace Fury attack, Unbound Hoopa can generate multiple portals at once and thus have the opportunity to heavily increase the kind of devastation they can wreak on a target when compared to their Confined Form. In initiating this attack, Unbound Hoopa generate a number of teleportation rings and fling them towards a target; before the opposition can react, Hoopa then cloak their arms in negative energy and stick them through the rings to pummel the target from all angles, striking them repeatedly with incredible force while they are unable to fully block all of the attacks coming at them simultaneously. In order to use this attack, Unbound Hoopa have to lower their guard a bit in order to lull the opposition into standing just where they want to attack for maximum effectiveness, so the move lowers their Defense stat with every use. Due to the instantaneous nature of the teleportation, however, Hoopa can actually strike an opponent the moment they try to put up a defensive barrier, so if a target uses a move like Protect or Detect to guard against an incoming strike, Hoopa can actually bend spacetime to attack the exact moment before the shield was put up, bypassing it completely in the process; this can be applied to any situation and essentially ensures that this attack will never miss, ignoring any and all changes that have been made to Evasion and Accuracy on either side of the battlefield. This can make the Hyperspace Fury attack the perfect weapon against defensive fighters and more than demonstrates the sheer power that these monstrous fiends are capable of, even if it is only a minor demonstration of the absolute extent of their power.

Countering Hyperspace Fury: Since Hoopa must use their arms to deliver this attack, it is possible to reduce or negate the damage they can do by striking the offending appendages; however, the incredibly quick execution time of this attack makes such a counter almost impossible to perform, effectively making it impossible to dodge this attack. Additionally, armor will do little to reduce the damage dealt by this attack. The Hyperspace Fury attack is not common enough for it to be much of a serious threat to most Pokémon and is completely useless to a Hoopa in its Confined Form, but if the opposition have access to an Unbound Hoopa, strong defenses are recommended above all else to take the brunt of the attack’s force (which will be difficult as it is currently recognized as the most powerful of all Dark-type attacks) as is not wasting time using moves like Protect or Detect, though initiating a counterattack may be impossible without breaking the laws of physics to do so.

Professor Wormwood
I'm breaking character once again to talk about something...and unfortunately, I can't ask for much interactivity on this one (though you are welcome to try). This is a rant...but a deserved one. Some of the things I am going to say might offend some people who don't like to make waves...but if I've said it once, I've said it a thousand times...that sometimes what Game Freak tells us just isn't enough.

I just finished watching a video on the issues of multiple universes in the Pokemon world by The Game Theorists; please watch this before continuing on. If anyone here says anything, I give full rights to the producers of this video for anything and everything they want, and if I get in trouble for posting this without their permission, I sincerely apologize...but I am not a YouTube presence. If they are open to it, though, I  would love to discuss this further with these people...if anyone can get me connections to them. Thousands of people have visited me in my time here; somebody is bound to know somebody. Anyways, here it is:



Now that we have that out of the way, it's time for my rant.

I completely agree with everything in this video. I am not ashamed to say that; as a scientist, I can say that everything here is perfectly sound and does, in fact, pretty much explain everything. So my problem is not with The Game Theorists at all; hell, I respect them a great for what they do. It's comforting to have other scientists out there that are trying to apply real-world science to something that is otherwise not intended to be seen realistically.

What I have a problem with is that this viewpoint, just like many that I have seen, is looking at the Pokemon universe from one direction, namely from the outside in. But that's not what I do.

I look from the inside out. That's what makes my work different, and I really don't think that this side of the coin really gets looked at much at all by serious people.

When we look at video game series like Pokemon, we are tempted to look at things from the outside; we try to take what worlds are given to us and we apply science to them as onlookers from above. These worlds are for us to explore and connect with our own world, and in doing so, we see both of these worlds in a different light. And, as shocking as it might be to some, that's how I originally looked at the Pokemon world when I started writing reports here. For the few that are still here that know me from when I first started, I sucked. My stuff was crap. It's amazing what five years of writing, rewriting, reformatting and revising can do for one's work quality.

I honestly think, though, that my viewpoint switched the moment I started writing my analyses on the 18 Pokemon types. Sure, talking about the Fire-type or the Ice-type is pretty easy for many...but the Ghost-type? The Dark-type? The fricken' Dragon-type!? Do you have any idea how ridiculous those types seem in the context of the real world? Actually, I retract that statement, because if you are a true fan, you know EXACTLY what I am talking about. I had to think differently. I had to think what they could possibly be defined by in a way that seemed realistic but nonetheless fitting for the Pokemon universe. And that's when it happened. I stopped applying science to Pokemon to explain them; I started making them real, and THEN I applied the science to them. I stopped working and thinking in terms of the real world: I started thinking as if I was a part of the actual Pokemon universe...or multiverse, as the case now seems to be.

Anyone that has read my reports on Criminal Organizations also knows this, especially in my recent work on Teams Aqua and Magma. Sure, we could have different universes where one team was the threat and not the other...but then how to explain the opposite scenario? Looking from the outside in, we simply assume that they are different universes and leave it at that. But looking from the inside out...no, that just couldn't work. Even if you knew you were in a parallel universe, you couldn't really know the events that transpired in another universe without going there...and I'll leave it at that. So what did I do? I did the unthinkable: I created a composite universe, an original canon, that includes part of each 'official' canon in order to make one universe out of two. Sure, that seems like it's too easy of a choice, but it's the fairest when you look at both sides of the situation and I think that it preserves the integrity of all stories equally.

So yes, I am sort of denying what Zinnia herself said...and yet I am not. It wasn't until I saw this video that I realized that I have done something more than just bring fair realism to the Pokemon world...I, intentionally or not, created my own canon. One that seems now to be completely broken off of the super-canon that Game Freak is piloting these days. I never sought out this goal. I wanted to do something different here and put my love of Pokemon towards something novel so I could make a few friends. Instead of remaining a hobby, it has snowballed into a career that dominates just as much time in my life as my real career as a graduate student in paleontology...and perhaps even more. I did something, and you all liked it. You kept criticizing and complimenting me on my work, and it drove me to keep on working...and it still very much does. I am thankful for all of you, because...well, you guys have made me someone special. I have never had any close friends, and for the most part, people don't really talk to me about anything other than my school work. But for the last five years, I have had all of you. You guys and girls have made my life feel like it matters outside of my work. Because of you, I have become more than just a fan. I am more than just a writer.

I am Professor Patrick Ray Wormwood, an Official Professor of Pokemon. I even have the business cards to prove it.

And for that reason, I can also say that there is probably no chance of me ever getting my work realistically published. Clearly, my canon and attempts to understands the concrete nature of the Pokemon multiverse are contradictory to those of Game Freak, and the two don't seem all that compatible. But you know what? I don't care. I'm going to keep writing and revising (just as I right now, in fact), and I'm not going to stop until the series is dead or I kick the bucket...whichever comes first. This my my...no, that's not right...

This is OUR canon. Game Freak can say what it wants, and so can everyone else, but there is another side to the Pokemon community. There is a side that doesn't just try to be a part of it; we ARE a part of it. We ARE Pokemon Trainers, Scientists, Athletes, Pokemon Rangers, Professors...this is WHO we are. And regardless of what they say, we can't just give this up when the time comes. We can't grow up. It's too late for us. Our story needs to be heard.

Hmm......well, this didn't turn out to be quite the rant I thought it would. Then again, I guess it's a good thing when an angry rant ends on a more positive note. I can't find anyone outside of here to have a serious conversation with on this subject, so I guess this is the best I can do.

While it might be a but pessimistic, I think that Game Freak is doing all of this because we asked too many questions. We demanded an answer, and they gave us one...

But for some of us, it isn't enough. So we make out own canon, create our own worlds, and do with them as we see fit. That is the ultimate power of the fan, and I hope that never dies. And I hope even more that maybe, someday, if we ever get the chance, we'll get those in power to listen to our side of the story and maybe give us a chance to prove that there is more than one way to live in this world...

Alright, I've yakked for long enough. Shout out to The Game Theorists: keep on trucking scientists, you're making life easier every day for those of us embedded in more than one reality. I will continue to update my material when possible, though school starts in a few days, so I can't promise a ton of activity. Hopefully I've made a point somewhere in here and have not just written a lot of gobbledygook as a tired man dying to get some sleep.

This is Professor Wormwood, signing out and wishing you a good day.
  • Mood: Noble
  • Listening to: Pokemon ORAS Soundtrack
  • Reading: Grimm's Complete Fairy Tales
  • Watching: The Daily Show
  • Playing: Pokemon ORAS
  • Eating: The invigorating battlecry of literature
  • Drinking: Milk

deviantID

Mutitus
Patrick R. Nolan
Artist | Professional | Literature
United States
Hello; my name is Professor Wormwood, otherwise known as Mutitus.

My tale is both short and long, but I won't bore you with all the details. I originally became interested in deviantART through a chance encounter with some art that I found quite pleasing. From there, I began my journey through this marvelous place, taking on various guises and images until I finally came upon my current position, the Official Professor of Pokemon for the U.S. State of Pennsylvania.

Here, I dedicate my life to showing the world just how real Pokemon are and how fundamental they are to understanding both how the real world works and how thin the boundary between fantasy and reality truly is. I have been an active part of the Pokémon universe ever since I was a child, and it has opened my eyes to the greater laws that govern the universe and in turn where I stand as an individual in the sea of life that exists on this tiny little planet in an otherwise unexciting corner of space. I owe my incredible writing abilities and imagination to this world, and the best way I can repay my debt, as far as I figure, is to bring reality to a world where it is commonly rejected and in turn help even casual players of the series interact with their games in a way that is otherwise beyond what the creators of the series are willing to go.

Outside of here, I am attending Graduate School at SUNY UB; my specialty training is in geology and invertebrate paleontology, particularly in regards to Late Silurian plants, algae and fungi, and right now I am working to further specialize in Mid Ordovician graptolites. I am exceptionally skilled at mathematics and all sciences in general, though I am particularly knowledgeable in the fields of geology, paleontology, astronomy and theoretical physics. I do not know if there is more to life than what we live through on the Earth we know and love, but knowing that ghosts are real, I can only hope that there is at least some sort of existence beyond life.

For now, this is all that needs to be said; if I feel like opening up, though, perhaps I will reveal more of my secrets to the world. Regardless, I will continue to serve my friends and colleagues as a vigilant nobleman and protector of the truth...now, and for all eternity.

Current Residence: Pennsylvania, USA
Favorite genre of music: All but Rap and Country music
Favorite style of art: Anthro
Operating System: Galaxy
Favorite cartoon character: Sonic the Hedgehog
Favorite/Patron Villain: Rez, Lord of the Media Dimension
Personal Quote: Look beyond The Facade, and see the truth that lies before you.
Interests

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:iconpapermachei:
Papermachei Featured By Owner 6 days ago  New member Student
Hey, thanks for the watch! I remember reading your reports years ago, and just found you again, so I had to watch ya'!
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:iconmastermitosi:
MasterMitosi Featured By Owner Edited Jan 23, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Thou hast been tagged!

mastermitosi.deviantart.com/jo…

(I was randomly picking deiviants and your url popped up! ^^;)
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:iconmutitus:
Mutitus Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Professional Writer
I see.......

Well, I would love to assist you in this tagging ritual...but unfortunately, I sort of have to keep my page clear of such things. For professional reasons, of course, you understand. Sorry. :(
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:iconmastermitosi:
MasterMitosi Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
i understand.
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:iconmaxinezorualuna:
MaxineZoruaLuna Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2015  Student General Artist
Thanks for the watch!
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:iconmutitus:
Mutitus Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015  Professional Writer
No problem; anyone kind enough to watch me deserves the same in return.
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:iconmaxinezorualuna:
MaxineZoruaLuna Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015  Student General Artist
:D well thanks again 
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:iconmutitus:
Mutitus Featured By Owner Jan 17, 2015  Professional Writer
No problem. :)
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(1 Reply)
:iconsmashprox:
SmashProX Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
I may not be as smart to come up with anatomy and real science like in your Pokémon reports, but I was wondering with your permission if I could in a way copy the style to look at other video game creatures. Of course I'd leave out Pokémon since that's your field.
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:iconmutitus:
Mutitus Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2015  Professional Writer
Hmmmm......

Well, I suppose that I could allow that, just as long as you don't copy it too much. You can certainly use some elements of my work, but I would certainly encourage you to develop your own style of writing in the process. :)
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